England supporters at lords chanting for the England cricket team

England Cricket Chants: The Barmy Army Passion

The historic Lord’s venue shakes with creativity and passion when England’s Barmy Army faithful unite in song. For decades, their carefully crafted chants have reverberated around England’s iconic cricket grounds – urging players to Ashes glory, wilting opponents through biting wit, and voicing the rollercoaster of emotions that is English cricket fandom. Learn the lyrical backstories behind favorites like “Swing Low Sweet Chariot” and “Jerusalem,” discover chant etiquette, and immerse yourself in England’s rich cricket heritage. When the Barmy Army’s voices ring out in chorus, a nation’s hopes and dreams soar beyond the boundary.

Club Information
Team:
England Cricket
Ground: Lord’s Cricket Ground
League: Test Cricket
Home Attendance: 28,000
Mascot: Lion

The Chants of the Barmy Army Faithful

For decades, the Barmy Army supporters have used their vocal coordination and lyrical creativity to produce an energizing atmosphere during England cricket matches. Hours before play begins, fans clutching pints and wearing England jerseys start humming popular ditties in anticipation. The Hollies Stand, housing the diehard fans, bellows out renditions of “Jerusalem” and other anthems. As the match progresses, the Barmy Army barrage opponents with good-natured teasing through their chants while praising their own players. Their renditions tell stories of Ashes glory, World Cup dreams and nostalgic memories. The Barmy Army acts as England’s twelfth man, willing the team to victory through their passionate songs. Chants like “Swing Low Sweet Chariot” ring around Lord’s as supporters fittingly serenade their heroes after play. For the Barmy Army faithful, chanting represents generations of unwavering devotion to English cricket. Their vocal passion sets the rhythm of the beautiful game played at the iconic Lord’s venue.

Popular England Cricket Chants

“Jerusalem”

  • About: England’s unofficial anthem
  • Tune: Original hymn by Hubert Parry
  • Context: Sung before matches to spur England on

Swing Low Sweet Chariot

  • About: England’s famous victory anthem
  • Full Lyrics: Swing low, sweet chariot Coming for to carry me home Swing low, sweet chariot Coming for to carry me home
    I looked over Jordan and what did I see Coming for to carry me home A band of angels coming after me Coming for to carry me home
    Swing low, sweet chariot Coming for to carry me home Swing low, sweet chariot Coming for to carry me home
    If you get there before I do Coming for to carry me home Tell all my friends I’m coming too Coming for to carry me home
    Swing low, sweet chariot Coming for to carry me home Swing low, sweet chariot Coming for to carry me home
  • Tune: African American spiritual song
  • Context: Sung in celebration of England victories since the 1980s. Made famous by fans at the Oval cheering on Ian Botham during Ashes Tests.

This famous spiritual is sung passionately by England fans to celebrate another victory. Its lyrics urging to “carry me home” make it the perfect anthem for cherishing triumphs.

This rousing hymn, praising England’s green and pleasant land, is belted out passionately by fans before matches. It stirs emotions and fires up players and supporters.

The Never-Ending Songs of the Barmy Army Faithful

Through their vocal creativity, the Barmy Army faithful create an electric atmosphere during England cricket matches. Their carefully crafted chants display their unwavering devotion to English cricket. The songs tell stories of Ashes glory, World Cup ecstasy and gut-wrenching defeats – all part of England’s cricketing rollercoaster. For decades, the Barmy Army’s voices have set the rhythm of matches at Lord’s and other iconic grounds. Their renditions echo far beyond the stadiums, symbolizing their eternal love for English cricket.

Wrapping It Up

The passionate songs of the Barmy Army are integral to the England cricket experience. Their creativity and coordination intimidate opponents while urging their own team to victory. Chants represent generations of loyalty to the Three Lions crest. Whether reliving past glories or voicing fresh hopes, the Barmy Army’s voices define the essence of English cricket culture.

Do’s and Don’ts of Chanting at England Matches

Do’s:

  • Learn the popular chants to sing along. Being familiar with the Barmy Army’s most beloved chants allows you to lend your voice to the chorus during matches. Singing along with gusto helps create an electrifying atmosphere that energises the England players and intimidates the opposition.
  • Applaud good cricket, even from opponents. Cricket is a gentleman’s game, and it’s important to recognise incredible talent or sporting gestures from the rival team. Appreciate moments of magic or brilliant skill from opponents by joining in applause – it’s a classy move that upholds the spirit of cricket. Enjoy the infectious match atmosphere.
  • Embrace the electric mood within the stadium and soak in the passion of your fellow England supporters. Feed off their infectious energy and camaraderie while immersing yourself in the unforgettable experience of an England cricket match.

Don’ts:

  • Don’t use offensive or discriminatory language. It is crucial to avoid any racist, sexist, or other abusive chants. Such language has no place in cricket and will only tarnish the reputation of English fans. Be creative and witty with chant lyrics – there is no need for offensive content.
  • Avoid overly aggressive chanting. While passion and intensity create an intimidating atmosphere, take care that chants do not cross the line into aggressive threats against opponents.
  • Maintain friendly competition and avoid provoking the opposition team or fans with the nature of your chants. Respect the opposition team and fans. Every team and fan base deserves respect. While rivalry is part of sport, do not denigrate or insult the opposition in your chants. Take care not to generalise their supporters either. Healthy competition thrives when both sets of fans maintain respect.